FAQ

This is the question we get most, particularly from those who are unaccustomed to bathtub shower screens. Considering each of the four edges of the bathtub shower screen in turn:

  • At the open end: The 33.5" models are wide enough to contain the water in most showers. The 30" wide models offer less water protection so it may be necessary to angle the shower head down more if you select one of these. If you have a shower curtain or sliding tub door it is possible to test how a shower screen would work by opening the curtain/door to 30/33.5" and running the shower. We recommend checking this, particularly if you are planning to order the 30" model.
  • Above: For typical bathtubs (around 14" high, or more), any of our models will be tall enough to keep the water in. The height a shower screen needs to be depends on the height of the shower head and pressure of the water – the higher the pressure, the higher the water will bounce when it hits the person showering. Most ‘off the shelf' sliding tub doors are 56-58" high, compared with our shortest shower screen which is 60" high. The additional height of the 64 and 70" models does not provide any additional functional benefit but customers sometimes select them for aesthetic reasons, e.g. to match the lines of a window or shower head. 
  • At the wall: The hinge for the semi-frameless shower screen is different to that of the frameless shower screen. With the semi-frameless design, the continuous hinge will not allow water to escape as long as the joint between the shower screen and the wall has been sealed (using 100% silicone caulk). With the frameless design, there is a gap of approximately 3/8" between the back of the glass and the wall. We provide wall seals to fill this gap but there are still joints between the seals hinge/bottom seal and the does permit a little water to escape. Additionally there are gaps between the fixed and moving parts of the hinges. Usually these joints/gaps don't cause any problems because the water does not tend to land there but nevertheless it is not perfect. 
  • Below: The bottom seal is formed to guide water running down the glass back into the bathtub and also to prevent water from escaping under the glass. The seal works well as long as the tub surface is flat and level or sloping into the tub, (so that the water will run into the tub and not towards the wall or bathroom floor) and the gap between the bottom of the glass is correct (i.e. 3/8 to 1/2" or 10mm).

Frequently Asked Questions

Below are answers to the questions we get asked most often. If you can't find an answer, please contact us.

Do Ark Showers screens let any water out?

This is the question we get most, particularly from those who are unaccustomed to bathtub shower screens. Considering each of the four edges of the bathtub shower screen in turn:

  • At the open end: The 33.5" models are wide enough to contain the water in most showers. The 30" wide models offer less water protection so it may be necessary to angle the shower head down more if you select one of these. If you have a shower curtain or sliding tub door it is possible to test how a shower screen would work by opening the curtain/door to 30/33.5" and running the shower. We recommend checking this, particularly if you are planning to order the 30" model.
  • Above: For typical bathtubs (around 14" high, or more), any of our models will be tall enough to keep the water in. The height a shower screen needs to be depends on the height of the shower head and pressure of the water – the higher the pressure, the higher the water will bounce when it hits the person showering. Most ‘off the shelf' sliding tub doors are 56-58" high, compared with our shortest shower screen which is 60" high. The additional height of the 64 and 70" models does not provide any additional functional benefit but customers sometimes select them for aesthetic reasons, e.g. to match the lines of a window or shower head. 
  • At the wall: The hinge for the semi-frameless shower screen is different to that of the frameless shower screen. With the semi-frameless design, the continuous hinge will not allow water to escape as long as the joint between the shower screen and the wall has been sealed (using 100% silicone caulk). With the frameless design, there is a gap of approximately 3/8" between the back of the glass and the wall. We provide wall seals to fill this gap but there are still joints between the seals hinge/bottom seal and the does permit a little water to escape. Additionally there are gaps between the fixed and moving parts of the hinges. Usually these joints/gaps don't cause any problems because the water does not tend to land there but nevertheless it is not perfect. 
  • Below: The bottom seal is formed to guide water running down the glass back into the bathtub and also to prevent water from escaping under the glass. The seal works well as long as the tub surface is flat and level or sloping into the tub, (so that the water will run into the tub and not towards the wall or bathroom floor) and the gap between the bottom of the glass is correct (i.e. 3/8 to 1/2" or 10mm).

When is an Ark Shower Screen a good solution?

An Ark Shower Screen works well with most bathtubs for over bath showers. If you have the typical set up, with a bathtub mounted in an alcove and the showerhead coming out of the wall above the drain then a shower screen will probably work for you.

When may an Ark Shower Screen not be suitable?

Occasionally we come across situations where our shower screens will not fit or function correctly, e.g.:

  • Alcove ceilings. Sometimes our customers have bathrooms in attic spaces where the ceiling slopes down away from the shower head. This leaves limited clearance for a shower screen, particularly at the top corner. Usually however the smallest model we offer with a rounded glass top corner will fit.
  • Bathtub features, e.g. decorative ‘steps’. Our shower screens are rectangular in shape so require that the tub and the wall meet at a right angle with no steps, rounded corners and similar features which would prevent them from sitting correctly. Sometimes modifications can be made to suit the shower screens but unfortunately the glass cannot be modified because it is tempered and will shatter.
  • Some one-piece bathtub surrounds. Some one-piece bathtub surrounds may be unsuitable for mounting shower screens to mainly because they may not have sufficient rigidity. Other surrounds are suitable however, it varies.
  • Tile protrusions, e.g. bull noses, chair rails. Tile protrusions will prevent the shower screen from being mounted correctly. Normally the protrusion can be modified to suit though.
  • Drop-in or free standing tubs. Bathtub shower enclosures must be constructed so that the water always returns to the bathtub; there cannot be any obstacles to prevent this (otherwise the water will go somewhere else, usually the floor). Alcove bathtubs are designed so that the tiles go down over the tub ledge and any water running down the walls will go into the tub. Drop in bathtubs normally have a tub ledge which is above the tile work, preventing the water from returning to the tub.
  • Body jets. Body jets normally project the water horizontally out from the wall at significant pressure. It is unlikely that our shower screens can contain the water.
  • Controls for air/water jet tubs. Sometimes massage tubs have control panels which are mounted such that they will prevent the movement of the shower screen in one direction (normally into the tub). This may not rule out the use of a shower screen but it is worth considering. Also, it is worth checking that the control panel is sufficiently watertight that it can be exposed to water from an overhead shower.
  • Showerheads which are not mounted at the end of the tub. If you have a rainshower which is mounted in the middle of the tub for example, the shower screen may not be wide enough to keep the water in.
  • Very uneven walls or tubs which are not level. A limited amount of adjustment is available within our shower screens to accommodate walls which are not plumb and tubs which are not level and this is sufficient for most situations. The semi-frameless models are more accommodating than the frameless models. However if the wall is a long way off plumb or the tub a long way off level then our shower screens may not work because they form a right angle at the corner where the tub and wall meet.
  • Tubs which are not flat. Very occasionally we come across tubs which are not flat, specifically they may have a depression in the surface which the bottom seal cannot accommodate. To date we have only every come across this situation with cast iron bathtubs.